Read: Frolic asks Abdi Nazemian five questions about LIKE A LOVE STORY

Click here for the full article. Highlights below:

Aurora: What was your inspiration behind your most recent novel?
Abdi: This is the story I’ve been wanting to tell since I started writing because it’s the most personal story I can think of, and one I don’t feel has ever been told. It’s about the fear and shame I felt as a queer immigrant kid who moved to the U.S. at the height of this country’s AIDS epidemic. And it’s also the story of the way I was able to overcome that fear and shame thanks to people who allowed me to see and accept myself for the first time. I was inspired to write this in honor of so many artists, activists and friends who have allowed me to have the life I have now. ACT UP inspired me. Madonna inspired me. All the friends and teachers who accepted me as a teen

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Read: BN Teen Blog’s rave review of LIKE A LOVE STORY

Click here for full review. Text below:

In every marginalized community, there comes a point where you can feel that generational divide, where you realize that this generation’s biggest concerns are wildly different from last generation’s. And that is, of course, largely the success of activism, of paving the way for a better future. But every year, I notice that nothing highlights this generational divide quite like Pride month, when, for some, history sits front and center, while others are immersed in all the ways queer identity and expression have changed during the rise of the digital age and social media in particular. It can be a difficult gap to bridge, and it doesn’t help that queer history rarely features in YA. Abdi Nazemian’s Like a Love Story isn’t the first YA to touch on the AIDS Crisis, as readers of David Levithan’s Two Boys Kissing,

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Read: Lambda Literary’s rave review of LIKE A LOVE STORY

Click here to read Lambda Literary's review. Text for the review below: It is a time when, for queer folks, the American flag is a trigger. Whether in storefronts, on car bumpers or snapping in the breeze, our country’s symbol has taken on new meaning. Those who display our flag are, in many cases, showcasing support for the Trump presidency. America’s stars and stripes are now a warning to members of the LGBTQIA+ community. At times, one might think, even just for a moment, “Are we moving backwards?” Abdi Nazemian’s third novel, Like a Love Story, is, in fact, an epic YA love story. Equally paramount, this book is an honest, heart-jerking history lesson. Nazemian transports readers to 1989, a time when queer culture was under attack. Reza is an Iranian teen and recent New York City transplant. His new life includes a new step family, a new school and a new hatred

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Read: Interview with Blue Willow Bookshop for Houston TeenBookCon

Abdi attended the 2018 TeenBookCon in Houston. Check out an interview he did with Blue Willow Bookshop in anticipation of the event. Read the full interview here. An excerpt:

We’ve read that one of your goals for your books is to tell stories of gay characters in immigrant communities. Can you tell us about why that’s important to you and how you plan to continue representing those characters?

When I realized I was gay, there were no stories about gay Iranians out there. It made me feel like I didn’t exist, or like the world didn’t want me to exist. So telling these stories feels like writing myself into existence, and giving the teenage me the stories he needed. Hopefully, the stories also give other queer people from immigrant communities some narratives to look to if they want to see themselves. The queer immigrant experience is often very different from the queer

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